1. Tio Andres spent an hour telling me all the books he loves to read, writing them all down for me to find in english when I got home, all while a group of his boys were trying to get him to play soccer with them. When he finally got over there, they were already playing, so he just sat down and watched with the last boy who waited for him to finish talking with me.

    Tio Andres spent an hour telling me all the books he loves to read, writing them all down for me to find in english when I got home, all while a group of his boys were trying to get him to play soccer with them. When he finally got over there, they were already playing, so he just sat down and watched with the last boy who waited for him to finish talking with me.

  2. Armed guards are everywhere in Guatemala. Going through traffic in Guatemala City, these guys were with us for only a short while. I took this picture when they first pulled up next to us. Once they saw me, their serious countenances fought to hide soft smiles. The man on the right winked at me as our lane of cars passed theirs.

    Armed guards are everywhere in Guatemala. Going through traffic in Guatemala City, these guys were with us for only a short while. I took this picture when they first pulled up next to us. Once they saw me, their serious countenances fought to hide soft smiles. The man on the right winked at me as our lane of cars passed theirs.

  3. 
He whistled at every woman he passed. None looked back.

I’ve been to Guatemala before many years ago. Since then, how I see has changed quite a bit. My perception of beauty and importance is much different. On this trip, I decided to experience through my camera. I tried to talk to the people I photographed. If that wasn’t possible, I wanted them to know I was taking their pictures. I wanted to interact and experience their reactions. Now when I look back at the images, they are much more meaningful than the anonymous images of my previous trip. They have stories. 

    He whistled at every woman he passed. None looked back.


    I’ve been to Guatemala before many years ago. Since then, how I see has changed quite a bit. My perception of beauty and importance is much different. On this trip, I decided to experience through my camera. I tried to talk to the people I photographed. If that wasn’t possible, I wanted them to know I was taking their pictures. I wanted to interact and experience their reactions. Now when I look back at the images, they are much more meaningful than the anonymous images of my previous trip. They have stories. 

  4. Unfolding a bill.

  5. Train money 2

    Train money 2

  6. "Relevance to Design"

    As someone who thinks everything is an act of design and can benefit from the perspective of a designer, I find it hard to explain any one thing’s relevance to the field of design. It seems self-serving. Shouldn’t I be explaining how design is relevant to said thing and not the other way around? I think I’m tired of writings to designers about design. If I wanted to be an enclosed subculture, I would have continued to pursue being an artist.

  7. Rirkrit Tiravanija, untitled 2006 (pavilion, table and puzzle) , 2006Walker Art Center 
In Tiravanija’s untitled 2006 installation, visitors are welcome to gather at a picnic table to assemble an expansive puzzle depicting Eugène Delacroix’s 1830 masterpiece, Liberty Leading the People. A pavilionlike structure, a replica of one designed by Jean Prouvé for use in French colonial Africa, completes a tableau that presents an amusing and ironic set of juxtapositions.

    Rirkrit Tiravanija, untitled 2006 (pavilion, table and puzzle) , 2006
    Walker Art Center 

    In Tiravanija’s untitled 2006 installation, visitors are welcome to gather at a picnic table to assemble an expansive puzzle depicting Eugène Delacroix’s 1830 masterpiece, Liberty Leading the People. A pavilionlike structure, a replica of one designed by Jean Prouvé for use in French colonial Africa, completes a tableau that presents an amusing and ironic set of juxtapositions.

  8. Passed this gem of an ad on the train this morning. I guess stirring up bad business connotations is one way to sell the great value[s] of your business school. Geesh.

    Passed this gem of an ad on the train this morning. I guess stirring up bad business connotations is one way to sell the great value[s] of your business school. Geesh.

  9. In-house design innovation  →

    Part 2 of a 2 part article on in-house design that triggered a gentle chorus of amens in my in-house designing soul, ever stuck between idealism and practicality.

  10. There’s this Pollyannaish notion that the most important thing to do when working together is stay positive and get along, to not hurt anyone’s feelings…Well, that’s just wrong. Maybe debate is going to be less pleasant, but it will always be more productive. True creativity requires some trade-offs.

    — Charlan Nemeth 
    Professor of Psychology at the University of California at Berkele


    (Source: newyorker.com)

  11. Nike+Fuelband

    Tracks your activity and translates it into NikeFuel. You can quantify your activity, track steps and calories, and set goals for yourself each day. Pretty cool.

    $150

  12. So… I’m trying not to buy every cool thing I see, but this is pretty awesome.

    Cuppow

    $8